Wednesday, October 5, 2022
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Pennsylvania County Files Key Lawsuit against Dominion Voting Systems

Fulton County, Pennsylvania filed a lawsuit against Dominion Voting Systems on Wednesday morning of this week. No municipal, county or state government has filed a lawsuit against Dominion (or any other entity) over its alleged wrongdoing in the 2020 election. The Department of Justice certainly hasn’t done any digging; many of them would be out of jobs right now if the contest had not been rigged and stolen.

Fulton County is a tiny rural county in Pennsylvania, so it’s Trump country. And not to dash everyone’s hopes, but even if Fulton County prevails in the lawsuit, the county’s handful of votes wouldn’t be able to overturn Pennsylvania’s certified fake results.

The lawsuit alleges that Dominion violated the terms of its contract in the last election. That would be the 2020 election, which we all know was the “safest and most secure” election in the history of earth.

The suit alleges that the machines violated Dominion and Pennsylvania’s rules for certification, meaning the machines should not have been used in 2020. The suit also claims the machines were connected to the internet and to foreign servers. There were strange, unauthorized computer coding scripts on the machines that should not have been there.

The Fulton County suit also alleges that Dominion’s security protocols on the machines were outdated. It also presents evidence that the machines were accessed remotely, and that random, unknown USB devices were inserted into the machines.

If everything in this lawsuit is proven to be true at trial, it should motivate every city, county and state election official in the country to question whether they should ever allow these machines to be used again (but it won’t). There’s a whole laundry list of major problems that Fulton County is suing Dominion over.

 

Here are some key takeaways from the suit. All of the following are allegations that Dominion will need to address if the case does go to trial.

Fulton County first noticed problems with the Dominion machines immediately after the 2020 election. Maybe it was the county’s small population that even allowed them to notice such a glaring problem. The number of votes cast and counted could not be reconciled with the data on the Dominion system. That same month, Fulton County also noticed that the machines didn’t meet the certification standards that had been set forth in 2019, in preparation for the presidential election.

The county commissioned a report that was finally issued on September 15, 2022, that stated that concluded that the “contractual terms, conditions, promises, and warranties provided to Fulton County by Dominion in the Agreement” had been violated.

The September report found that unauthorized USB drives had been inserted into all the machines at various times prior to the 2020 election. There’s no way to determine whether or to what extent those USB drives compromised the system or the data. The report concluded that a “Python script” had been added to the machines at some point AFTER they were certified, which is a big no-no. Once a machine is certified, it’s not supposed to be accessed or altered in any way. Why is there unknown computer code on these machines that was only added after the certification date?

Each of the drives on the Dominion system were interconnected to all other drives in the system, according to the report. In layman’s terms, that means someone could access a Fulton County machine from another county in Pennsylvania and fiddle with election results with no one’s knowledge, or vice versa. You can’t have these machines all connected TO EACH OTHER in remote locations and then claim that your system is secure!

One of the workstations used in Fulton County during the 2020 election was connected to an outside server. In QUEBEC, CANADA. I probably don’t even need to explain why that’s a problem in an American election, do I?

And here’s a takeaway that should make everyone’s jaw hit the floor. Guess what antivirus and security software Dominion was allegedly running on its machines in Fulton County for the 2020 election? Go ahead, guess! You’re not going to get this right, because it is so completely absurd.

Windows Defender. Updated for 2016.

That’s not a joke. That’s real. The machines were running Windows Defender software that hadn’t been updated since 2016. We’re going to keep an eye on this lawsuit because it’s really important and these developments could have a big impact on future elections. Good luck, Fulton County!


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