Monday, February 26, 2024
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Supreme Court Interrupts Its Schedule for Emergency Trump Hearing

Well, you don’t see this very often. In normal years, the Supreme Court takes a three-week break from hearing oral arguments between late January and mid-February. Not this year, though. They have scheduled an emergency hearing on the Trump v. Anderson case, in which the Colorado Supreme Court wants to ban Donald Trump from the ballot in Colorado because of the fake insurrection.

This is pretty much an acknowledgement by the Supreme Court that the Democrats have created a constitutional crisis through their extreme lawfare against America’s real president.

It’s extremely rare for the Supreme Court to interrupt their schedule—especially their breaks from work—in order to fast-track a case. I couldn’t even find the last time this has happened historically. When that lunatic special prosecutor asked the Supreme Court to fast track a decision on presidential immunity, by skipping over the Appeals court, the high court denied his request. They’re busy enough as it is, and they only fast-track cases when it truly is a constitutional crisis sort of deal.

 

On December 19th, the Hillary Clinton Fan Club known as the “Colorado Supreme Court” issued a farce of a ruling that Trump should be banned from the ballot for the March 5th primary in that state. They ruled that the president had engaged in insurrection for telling the January 6th crowd to “peacefully” make their voices heard in a constitutionally protected protest.

Of course, Trump didn’t even show up at the Capitol that day because Secret Service wouldn’t let him go. Being present at the insurrection is sort of one of the main prerequisites for waging insurrection, but whatever. It’s the Bad Orange Man we’re talking about, so the Democrats have to “get” him. There were also no weapons present at the supposed insurrection, and no law enforcement body has ever charged Donald Trump or any of the 1,200+ January 6ers with insurrection.

Just a few days after the Colorado Kangaroo Court issued their ruling, the Maine Secretary of State (also a big Hillary fan) took it upon herself to deny the voters the opportunity to vote for Donald Trump. Secretary Shenna Bellows single-handedly decided that the 400,000 Republican voters in Maine should not have an opportunity to participate in democracy this year, by removing Trump from the ballot for “insurrection.”

Additional cases to kick Trump off the ballot are pending in somewhere around 15 states.

The Supreme Court has unexpectedly scheduled oral arguments for Trump v. Anderson on February 8th. That’s a Thursday, which is even more odd. In normal weeks, the Supreme Court only schedules oral arguments for a Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday. The fact that the court is taking up the case during what is normally a break for them, and on a day of the week when they never hear oral arguments, suggests that they are putting the case on an extreme fast track.

Since the March 5th primary in Colorado is approaching so rapidly, the court could issue a ruling within a matter of days. Regular court observers believe that the justices will quickly put an end to this obvious election interference. The ruling will most likely overturn the Colorado Supreme Court decision and nullify all the other state-level attempts to kick Trump off the ballot. There’s no other logical ruling that the court could come to.

Individual states cannot kick the presidential frontrunner off the ballot for an imaginary crime that he hasn’t even been charged with. Sane people understand the chaos this would inject into the system. Other states would just start kicking Joe Biden off the ballot. They could even make up imaginary crimes, since that’s the standard that the Colorado Supreme Court is using.

Texas could kick Biden off the ballot for pedophilia, while Idaho kicks him off for drunk driving. And so on. Neither candidate would be able to reach the 270 votes necessary to secure victory in the electoral college. Then, Congress gets to decide who can win the presidency. Does anyone really want that? Is it worth wrecking our entire system here in the United States, just because the Democrats want to pull more of their childishly transparent election interference stunts?

The Supreme Court’s decision on Trump v. Anderson will also set the tone for all of the eventual appeals of President Trump’s criminal convictions, which will likely happen this summer. He’s facing four separate illegitimate indictments on 91 criminal counts (two state and two federal cases). These will all be rigged trials and he’ll be convicted by all-Democrat juries.

It looks like the Supreme Court is about to send a big signal—likely this month—as to how Trump’s appeals will go in all of those bogus cases.


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