Monday, August 15, 2022
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Vaccinated Young People Increasingly Dying from Suddenly in the US

The news of three young, healthy, prominent, athletic Americans dying from “suddenly” has broken in just the last three days. One was an NFL third round draft pick. One was a first round NBA draft pick. One was a young dancer who died on her wedding day. All of their deaths are being described by the press as being from “natural causes” or “suddenly.” If you believe that at this point, we have a bridge for sale that we think you’re going to love.

Danielle Hampson was 34 years old when she died “suddenly” a few days ago. She was the mother of a one-year-old baby and was scheduled to marry her fiancé, X Factor star Tom Mann, on the day when she was found dead. She was a dancer and had toured with numerous musical acts during her career. She was extremely healthy due to her career, and it is truly a black swan event for someone like her to die “suddenly” and so unexpectedly in her sleep on her wedding day.

Caleb “Biggie” Swanigan died from “natural causes” this week. The 25-year-old was a standout basketball player at Purdue University. The Portland Trail Blazers picked him in the first round of the NBA draft in 2017. He was one of the top athletes in the world and now he’s dead. Exactly what “natural cause” do 25-year-old NBA players die from? Answer: There is no such thing as a “natural cause” that a top athlete in their mid-20s can die from. There are some causes that can make athletes that age die, but they aren’t natural.

And on Wednesday, Baltimore Ravens linebacker Jaylon Ferguson died at the age of 26. He was a star player at Louisiana Tech and was picked in the third round of the NFL Draft by the Ravens in 2019. In three NFL seasons, the star pass rusher racked up 67 tackles and 4.5 sacks. No signs of trauma or foul play. Just another death of one of the healthiest young athletes in the world from “suddenly.”

 

These healthy young people in their 20s and 30s do all have one thing in common. They were all vaccinated against COVID. Maybe there’s some other explanation out there. But if there is, health officials are not willing to tell us what it is. Maybe 34-year-old Dani Hampson died of a drug OD on her wedding day, but I highly doubt it. You kind of have to wonder why no in charge wants to conduct an autopsy on any of these healthy young people who are dying from “suddenly.”

This never used to happen to young, healthy people before the COVID vaccines. Anytime a young and healthy person died before the COVID vaccines it usually involved a car moving at high speed and a telephone pole. But now that the “vaccines” are being mass injected into young people, to protect them against a disease that might not even make them sick, they’re dropping like flies. It’s becoming a “new normal” for healthy young people to die from “natural causes” or “suddenly” as doctors have named the syndrome killing scores of vaccinated people.

19-year-old TikTok star Cooper Noriega collapsed and died in a Los Angeles parking lot on June 10th. An unnamed Bayside High School football player collapsed and died during practice in Virginia Beach on June 9th. 16-year-old sophomore Jason Perry in Breathitt County, Kentucky died “suddenly” on June 5th.

23-year-old Tyler Mescher died “unexpectedly” on June 1st. He was a three-sport state champion athlete in high school and a college athlete. On May 30th, 19-year-old Aiden Kaminska died “unexpectedly” at home. He had just finished his second season playing Lacrosse for the University of Massachusetts.

I could keep going, but you get the point. All of these young, healthy people across the country are dying from “suddenly” or “unexpectedly” or from “natural causes.” This never used to happen before the COVID vaccines were rolled out.


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